ASRA - Australian Skateboard Racing Association

i saw some guys rayne with his otangs(83a durians) flipped so that the graphic was facing inwards.

whats the go with that?

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Yeah, I'm not usually one to have an opposing opinion, but I rotated my street board wheels for years and whilst I could never really get them to stay to their true shape I found it did help a fair bit. It also give the added coolness of very screechy slides, especially with harder wheels ,)
Also as a side note, not all 4 wheels will wear at the same rate anyway, so you can't simply turn each wheel around on the same axle or you'll end up with differing circumferences which can cause problems of their own...
Bugs said:
Fitz, you should be more trusting. I would never take the piss. Here's my skillfull rendering of a trapezoidal wheel with the axle/hanger emerging from the side. My Solidworks skills are really improving.



That's how pretty much all of my wheels end up. I don't flip offset wheels, but I do flip my sidewinders and these other cheapo centre set wheels and it evens them out quite well, especially if you keep on top of it and don't let it go too far either way.
my classic ks have worn just like this, and they are a full offset design, that wold support fitz theory,
both sides have worn like this even though i was only doing heelside slides.

under the same conditions, my buddies ceterset wheels have worn the same on his heelside but in the opposite direction (relative to the hanger) on his toeside.

both of these observations support fitz statement.

Bugs said:
Fitz, you should be more trusting. I would never take the piss. Here's my skillfull rendering of a trapezoidal wheel with the axle/hanger emerging from the side. My Solidworks skills are really improving.

I'll be happy to be a part of this experiment. :)

but i'll need someone to send me some new wheels so as to make it a controlled experiment. :D

haha, worth a try. :D

However on a more serious note, i agree with bugs because when you think about the physics of it the area that gets coned is the part that has the most downwards force on it while sliding... when i slide i don't have my weight even;y distributed on all 4 wheels, or even 2 for that matter, that is why my wheels all have different coning patterns.

what causes coning is the friction created between the wheel and the surface of the road, and friction is increased with greater downward force... i would draw a picture but i don't know how haha.

cheers guys. :D
What Fitz is talking about is this:

Both inner and outer lips are high, and the wheels wear most in line with the bearings. If you turn hard but don't slide your wheels will look like this.
sounds like the only way to conclusively test this theory is to mount an unworn set of wheels inside out and slide them to see the wear pattern.

I still stand by my belief that wear is relative to the bearing rather than the wheels position on the axle (inside or out).
don't forget bent axles

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